Letter C

The Definition of Co-Witness Sighting

Arsenal Exchange - Firearms Classifieds - Industry Directory

Co-Witness Sighting

Co-Witness Sighting is the use of any iron sight mounted onto a rifle that is fitted with an optical sight as a primary sighting system. They come in two basic configurations, fixed or flip-up. The idea is that if you align your red dot and your iron sights you have a backup aiming system on the gun.


19 Other Firearms Definitions You Need To Know


Federal Assault Weapons Ban

Part of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. It produced a 10-year federal ban on the manufacture of new semi-automatic assault weapons with certian specifications. Firearms with specific features were defined as assault rifles. Including the AR-15, certain versions of the AK-47, the TEC-9, the MAC-10 and the Uzi, several of which had become the preferred weapon of violent drug gangs. The act also bans large-capacity ammunition magazines, limiting them to 10 rounds. The law did not apply to weapons that were already in legal possession.
Because this law was not renewed by congress in 2004, the ban was lifted.

Snub-Nose

Slang word for short barreled revolver.

Slamfire

A premature, unintended discharge of a firearm that occurs as a round is being loaded into the chamber.

Magazine Loader

A mechanical device to make it easier to fill magazines using less hand strength and without hurting one's fingertips or thumbs.

Ricochet

A rebound, bounce or skip off a surface, particularly in the case of a projectile.

Bore

The tunnel down the barrel of a firearm through which the projectiles travel.

  • A smooth-bore firearm is one that does not have rifling on the barrel's internal surface.
  • A big-bore firearm is one that fires a large caliber.
  • A small-bore firearm is one that fires a small caliber.

Rim

The edge on the base of a cartridge case which stops the progress of the case into the chamber.

WCF

Abbreviation for Winchester Centerfire.

Mercury Recoil Compensator

A device fitted inside the buttstock of a heavily-recoiling gun or rifle, usually containing mercury and a valve. As the gun recoils, the mercury is displaced temporarily, increasing the duration, and thus diminishing the perceived impact of the recoil. The added half-pound of weight doesn't hurt either.

Closed Bolt Firing System

A type of firearm in which the action is closed, with a cartridge in the chamber prior to firing. When the trigger is pressed the cartridge is fired, and the action cycles loading another cartridge into chamber and when firing is stopped the bolt remains closed and the chamber remains loaded.

Backstop

Anything that will safely stop a bullet and prevent it from hitting anything else after the target is struck.

Charging Handle

A device on a firearm which, when operated, results in the hammer or striker being cocked or moved to the ready position.

Mushroomed Bullet

A description of a bullet whose forward diameter has expanded after penetration.

Quad Barrelled

A gun, typically artillery, with four barrels, such as the ZPU

Carbine

A rifle with a relatively short barrel.

Crisp Trigger

A trigger that breaks (to release the hammer) easy.

X-Bolt

A bolt-action designed by Browning firearms. The x-bolt action features a short 60° bolt lift. So it is fast cycling and allows working the bolt quicker without the scope getting in the way.

Pistol Grip

The handle on a pistol. Can also refer to a vertical grip behind the trigger on a rifle.

FPS

Abbreviation for feet per second. A term used in expressing the velocity of a bullet.